Man charged with reckless homicide in crash that killed pregnant mom, 3 kids

JOLIET — A northern Illinois man has been charged with felony reckless homicide in a crash that left a pregnant woman and her three young sons dead.The Will County State’s Attorney’s office and the county sheriff’s office announced the charges Tuesday afternoon against 25-year-old Sean Woulfe of Beecher. Officials say Woulfe is in custody.Authorities say Woulfe was driving more than 20 mph over the posted 55 mph speed limit and failed to stop at a stop sign. Officials say his pickup

Source: Man charged with reckless homicide in crash that killed pregnant mom, 3 kids

Click above to read.

Family members may sue at fault driver for wrongful death. Most likely in situation like this not much insurance to cover damages. Mother’s insurance may have some coverage for underinsured claim. Sad situation all around.

9 Answers To Burning Questions About Social Security – NoPhysicalTermLife.com

Source: 9 Answers To Burning Questions About Social Security – NoPhysicalTermLife.com

Click above to read.

John Hawthorne provides some good information regarding Social Security that you need to know. If you have paid into the Social Security system the required number of quarters, then you will be eligible for Social Security Disability benefits you are unable to work.

Mock Interview of Social Security Disability Judge

I have represented Social Security Disability claimants for a number of years and this is what I would imagine an Administrative Law Judge would tell you about the hearing process.

Q: What is your main job?

A: My role is to come up with a fair decision after applying the facts and Social Security rules and law. This involves asking the claimant a number of questions for approximately one hour, and reviewing the medical records usually covering a two to three year period.

Q: What would you tell someone who is going to appear before you for their disability hearing?

A: The hearing is different from television legal shows or other courtrooms in a number of ways. As the Judge I spend a great deal of time asking the person seeking disability a number of questions. The questions include background questions about their living arrangements, daily activities, ability to perform chores, symptoms and limitations as result of their conditions. I will often ask why they cannot work a job. At the end of the hearing I will ask a vocational consultant how certain limitations effect the ability to perform jobs.

Q: What is the most important thing you look for in deciding whether a person is disabled?

A: The medical records tell the real story. People who do not go the doctor on a regular basis do not have much of a chance to win their case. The law requires a person to prove their case. The observations of medical personnel, medical tests such as an xray, mri, breathing test, or heart test are important ways of proving the basis for pain and limitations. There are certainly other ways such as disability parking placard forms and prescriptions for braces, canes, walkers also.

Q: What advice would you give to someone seeking disability?

A: Make sure get professional help from the beginning. The disability process is long and complex. The Social Security law only allows a lawyer to be paid if they win your case. Social Security Disability benefits, in most situations, cover your lifetime. The attorney fee is a small amount in comparison to lifetime benefits.

As I mentioned this is what I think a Social Security Judge would tell you based on my experience. Specific questions about your case? Feel free to contact Illinois Social Security Disability Attorney Dirk May at 309-827-4371.

Mock Interview of Illinois Workers’ Compensation Arbitrator

This what I imagine an arbitrator, what they call a Workers’ Compensation Judge in Illinois, would tell you about the inner workings of the work injury system.

Q: What is the main part of your job?

A: The most important part of my job is to decide disputed cases and provide a well reasoned ruling as quickly as possible. I understand that an injured worker’s life has been interrupted and if they meet the requirements of the law they are entitled to off work pay, medical benefits and compensation for the injury. At the same time, the employer should not have to pay for medical treatment and any additional money to a person who was not injured on the job.

Q: What are you looking for when you have a trial?

A: Really for me there are two main aspects of the case I focus on. First, are the witnesses believable. In most cases there are only one or two witnesses, and the injured worker is the person who testifies the longest. Witnesses who tell a story that doesn’t make sense do not get very far with me. Witnesses who fight the lawyers or who are angry make it difficult at times. The second part is looking at the medical records. They really do tell a story.

Q: What specifically are you looking for in the medical records?

A: Did the injured worker go to the doctor right away? It does not make much sense if you are seriously injured and delay in seeing the doctor. Did you tell the medical personnel how you were hurt? Why would someone hide important information from their doctor?

Q: Any other important information you look for?

A: Did the injured worker file an accident report? Or is there a witness to the accident. These things can certainly make an injured worker’s case stronger.

Q: What about doctor testimony?

A: Sometimes in a close case regarding whether the accident could have caused the medical condition there are some complex issues. However, in most cases the medical records really show what is happening and the doctors are just confirming what makes sense.

As mentioned, this is what I believe an Arbitrator would tell you. But remember this is just my take on important parts of a case.

Questions about your work comp case? Feel free to contact Illinois Workers’ Compensation Attorney Dirk May at 309-827-4371.